PROJECT 1

Hamilton, Scotland

Renewable Energy Power Plant

Synergy World Power (SWP) is developing a 27.5 MW waste to energy project in South Lanarkshire, Scotland.
The Energy Centre will consume 300,000 tonnes per year of pre-prepared Solid Recovered Fuel, SRF, or Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) processed from commercial industrial and municipal sources, destined for land-fill.
The power plant will generate 27.5 MW of clean electrical energy using SWP’s patent pending LoNOx technology.
The site which is near Hamilton has extant permission for a waste to energy facility.
SWP’s technology offers reliable, environmentally friendly, power plants that use conventional steam turbines as prime movers for electrical generation. The air-fed rotary-kiln gasification system offers many advantages over pyrolysis or incineration for the thermal treatment of Municipal Solid Waste, MSW, or its derivatives. Advantages of SWP’s technology include very low emissions, improved efficiency compared to incineration producing heat for conversion into electrical energy and a non-hazardous sintered solid residue suitable for construction fill.

PROJECT 2

Whitecross, Scotland

Integrated Waste to Energy and Plastics to Liquid Fuels Facility

Synergy World Power (SWP) is developing waste to energy and plastics to liquid fuels project near Whitecross, Scotland.
The Energy Centre will consume over 325,0000 tonnes per year of pre-prepared Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF)/ Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and selected plastics processed from commercial industrial and municipal sources, destined for land-fill. The power plant is to be located on a former industrial complex and will generate 27.5 MW of clean electrical energy using SWP’s patent pending LoNOx technology. The technology provides reliable, environmentally friendly, power plants that use conventional steam turbines as prime movers for electrical generation.
The rotary kiln gasification WTE power plant will use approximately 900 t/d of SRF or RDF. The plant will generate 27.5 MW of renewable electrical power from the biomass components of sorted municipal and commercial solid waste.
In addition the PTLF plant will use a thermo-catalytic pyrolysis process to convert an of average of 100 tonnes per day of selected plastics to liquid fuels such as diesel and naphtha (a component of petrol). This process also produces a fuel gas that will be used for heating and power generation for the plant, as well as a char fuel that can be used by the WtE gasifiers.